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U.S. and Portuguese Marines Participate In Amphibious Beach Assault Training Exercise

World Affairs

Open Eyes Opinion {source: USN}

U.S. and Portuguese Marines Assault Beach in Portugal during Trident Juncture 15

 

 

 

 

 

By Corey Hensley

PINHEIRO DA CRUZ, PRAIA DA RAPOSA, Portugal – U.S. Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), aboard the USS Arlington (LPD 24), and Portuguese Marines completed an amphibious beach assault training exercise, Oct. 20, 2015, at Pinheiro Da Cruz, Praia Da Raposa beach, Portugal, while participating in Trident Juncture 15.

The beach assault exercise demonstrated how well the U.S. and Portuguese Marines worked together, how inter-operable the U.S. equipment and tactics are with allied nations, and the flexibility of NATO forces.

Continue reading for some quick facts and additional links … 

A U.S. Marine with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, from the USS Arlington (LPD-24) holds security with a Portuguese Marine at Pinheiro Da Cruz, Praia Da Raposa beach in Portugal, while participating in a combined amphibious assault exercise, as part of Trident Juncture 2015 Oct. 19. Trident Juncture is a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO and partner nations. (United States Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Austin Long/ Released)

 

Quote:

“This exercise demonstrates that the U.S. Marine Corps can operate anywhere in the world, and it demonstrates that we can operate with the Portuguese Marines. If we can do that here, then we can do that with them anywhere in the world. The big expectations of what this assault would show are that NATO is able to demonstrate its flexibility, NATO is reliable, and NATO is dependable. At this small tactical level, we expected to see that Portuguese Marines and U.S. Marines can work together, our equipment is inter-operable, and our tactics, techniques, and procedures all work very well together. All the expectations were met and seen during the beach assault exercise.”

– U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Eric Hamstra, lead planner, Strike Force NATO

Quick Facts:

  • U.S. and Portuguese Marines, along with a variety of armored military vehicles, embarked on two landing craft air-cushions, or LCACs, and were transported from Arlington to the beach.
  • Other U.S. Marines and Portuguese Marines were inserted via the embarked CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters from Arlington.
  • Once on the beach, U.S. and Portuguese Marines worked together to secure the beach head and maintain security, while U.S. Marines drove vehicles from the LCACs inland.
  • The Marines then advanced forward with the vehicles to establish a forward command operations center and logistics staging area that will allow for quicker coordination during following training exercises.
  • Trident Juncture is the largest NATO Exercise to be conducted in the past 20 years with around 36,000 troops from more than 30 nations, to include both NATO Allies and Partners.
  • Trident Juncture 15 is an exercise designed to work with allies in order to maintain high-end war fighting readiness across NATO. The 26th MEU’s role while participating in this exercise is to work with NATO and its partners in order to strengthen maritime security, stability, and overall relationships.
  • The exercise is an opportunity for U.S. forces to work with allies and partners to maintain high-end, war-fighting readiness in order to ensure U.S. alliances remain strong and show a unity of effort across NATO. Conducting this exercise aims to utilize the partnership of U.S. forces and partner nations to build maritime security and stability for the development of new forward capabilities in theater.
  • By securing the maritime environment allies can promote regional and global economic, energy, and food security. By operating while forward deployed in partnership with African and European nations, NATO is helping them build their capacity and capability to protect their waters, security and commerce.
  • The beach assault exercise was a demonstration of how the U.S. and Portuguese Marines can work together, they have the capability to work together, and they are committed to their alliances.
  • Participating in an exercise of this scale is important for the Navy and Marine Corps because it demonstrates the commitment of the U.S. to NATO.
  • Working with the Portuguese during this exercise allows for U.S. forces to strengthen partnerships and improve its ability to operate and cooperate with allied militaries.

151020-M-CV548-054 PINHEIRO DA CRUZ, PRAIA DA RAPOSA, Portugal (Oct. 20, 2015) A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) transporting U.S. Marines and Portuguese Marines from the USS Arlington (LPD 24) moves towards Pinheiro Da Cruz during a combined amphibious assault exercised as part of Trident Juncture 15, Oct. 20, 2015. Trident Juncture is a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO and partner nations. Arlington, part of the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group, is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Jeraco Jenkins/Released)

 

151020-M-CV548-095 PINHEIRO DA CRUZ, PRAIA DA RAPOSA, Portugal (Oct. 20, 2015) U.S. and Portuguese Marines disembark from a Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) on Pinheiro Da Cruz beach to during a combined amphibious assault exercised as part of Trident Juncture 15, Oct. 20, 2015. Trident Juncture is a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO and partner nations. The Marines are part of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, embarked on the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Jeraco Jenkins/Released)

 

151020-M-CV548-139 PINHEIRO DA CRUZ, PRAIA DA RAPOSA, Portugal (Oct. 20, 2015) Portuguese Marines provide security as a U.S. Marine Corps Landing Amphibious Vehicle (LAV) disembarks from a Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) on Pinheiro Da Cruz beach to during a combined amphibious assault exercised as part of Trident Juncture 15, Oct. 20, 2015. Trident Juncture is a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO and partner nations. The Marines are part of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, embarked on the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Jeraco Jenkins/Released)

 

By Sgt. Austin Long, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit Public Affairs

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[photo credits-featured image: “US Navy 050628-N-1397H-099 U.S. Marines assigned to the 3rd Amphibious Assault Battalion based out of Camp Pendleton, Calif., tread along the shoreline in Amphibious Assault Vehicles (AAVs)” by U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Prince A. Hughes III – This Image was released by the United States Navy with the ID 050628-N-1397H-099 (next).This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.বাংলা | Deutsch | English | español | euskara | فارسی | français | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | македонски | മലയാളം | Plattdüütsch | Nederlands | polski | português | Türkçe | 中文 | 中文(简体)‎ | +/−. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:US_Navy_050628-N-1397H-099_U.S._Marines_assigned_to_the_3rd_Amphibious_Assault_Battalion_based_out_of_Camp_Pendleton,_Calif.,_tread_along_the_shoreline_in_Amphibious_Assault_Vehicles_(AAVs).jpg#/media/File:US_Navy_050628-N-1397H-099_U.S._Marines_assigned_to_the_3rd_Amphibious_Assault_Battalion_based_out_of_Camp_Pendleton,_Calif.,_tread_along_the_shoreline_in_Amphibious_Assault_Vehicles_(AAVs).jpg]

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