Key Facts About Interracial Marriage In The United States

Key Facts About Race And Marriage, 50 Years After Loving vs. Virginia

Diversity and Unity

In 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the Loving v. Virginia case that marriage across racial lines was legal throughout the country. Intermarriage has increased steadily since then: One-in-six U.S. newlyweds (17%) were married to a person of a different race or ethnicity in 2015, a more than fivefold increase from 3% in 1967. Among all married people in 2015 (not just those who recently wed), 10% are now intermarried – 11 million in total.

Here are more key findings from Pew Research Center about interracial and interethnic marriage and families on the 50th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision.

1./ A growing share of adults say interracial marriage is generally a good thing for American society. Nearly four-in-ten adults (39%) say the growing number of people marrying someone of a different race is good for society, up from 24% in 2010. Adults younger than 30, those with at least a bachelor’s degree and those who identify as a Democrat or lean Democratic are especially likely to say this.

Americans today also are less likely to oppose a close relative marrying someone of a different race or ethnicity. Now, 10% say they would oppose such a marriage in their family, down from 31% in 2000. The biggest decline has occurred among nonblacks: Today, 14% of nonblacks say they would oppose a close relative marrying a black person, down from 63% in 1990.

2./ Asian and Hispanic newlyweds are the most likely to be intermarried. Nearly three-in-ten Asian newlyweds (29%) were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity in 2015, as were 27% of Hispanic newlyweds. Intermarriage for these groups was especially prevalent among the U.S. born: 39% of U.S.-born Hispanics and almost half (46%) of U.S.-born Asian newlyweds were intermarried in 2015.

Although Asian and Hispanic newlyweds are most likely to be intermarried, overall increases in intermarriage have been driven in part by rising intermarriage rates among black and white newlyweds. The most dramatic increase has occurred among black newlyweds, whose intermarriage rate more than tripled from 5% in 1980 to 18% in 2015. Among whites, the rate rose from 4% in 1980 to 11% in 2015.

3./ The most common racial or ethnic pairing among newlywed intermarried couples is one Hispanic and one white spouse (42%). The next most common intermarriage pairings are one white and one Asian spouse (15%). Some 12% of newlywed intermarried couples include one white and one multiracial spouse, and 11% include one white and one black spouse.

4./ Newlywed black men are twice as likely as newlywed black women to be intermarried. In 2015, 24% of recently married black men were intermarried, compared with 12% of newly married black women. There are also notable gender differences among Asian newlyweds: Just over one-third (36%) of newlywed Asian women were intermarried in 2015, compared with 21% of recently married Asian men.

Among white and Hispanic newlyweds, intermarriage rates are similar for men and women.

5./ Since 1980, an educational gap in intermarriage has begun to emerge. While the rate of intermarriage did not differ significantly by educational attainment in 1980, today there is a modest gap. In 2015, 14% of newlyweds with a high school diploma or less were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity. In contrast, 18% of those with some college experience and 19% of those with a bachelor’s degree or more were intermarried.

The educational gap is most striking among Hispanics. Nearly half (46%) of Hispanic newlyweds with a bachelor’s degree were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity in 2015, yet this share drops to 16% for those with a high school diploma or less.

Continue Reading Complete Report With Graphs: http://pewrsr.ch/2tcaRtz

[Source: BY /Pew Research Center/ pewresearch.org -/- Media Relations]
[Photo Credits: inserted by openeyesopinion.com credits embedded]

Note:
Photo of Kristen Bialik

is a research assistant at Pew Research Center.

###


Discover The Best Places To Retire, Do Business And Live Overseas

Visiting Las Vegas?… Check out this website first

Take a look at the Most Popular Trip Insurance plans Allianz has to offer

Compare Cheap Flights from the Departure City of your Choice with Airfarewatchdog!




Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 openeyesopinion.com
Share This Post
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Reddit0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on LinkedIn0Digg thisShare on Yummly0Share on Tumblr0Buffer this pagePrint this pageEmail this to someone





Related News

  • University Experiment: Students Reject Donald Trump’s Tax Plan – However, When Told It’s Bernie Sanders They Praise It (?)
  • Trump Administration Terminates The EPA’s “Sue And Settle” Activities
  • We Sit Too Much, The Human Body Was Not Designed For A Sedentary Lifestyle
  • US Assistant Secretary Of Defense For homeland Defense And Global Security Outlined Government Approach To Cyberdefense
  • Smartphone Wi-Fi Security Risk – US Federal Trade Commission Researchers Found Bug In Wi-Fi Network Encryption
  • Two US Marines Helped To Save Lives During The Las Vegas Attack
  • Was U.S. Security Compromised By The Obama-Clinton Deals With Russia?
  • Tax Reform – Democrats In Congress Fiercely Oppose Losing Some Write-Offs That Benefit The Wealthy (?)
  • California National Guardsmen Help With Fire Victim Evacuees
  • The U.S. Immigration Population Hits The Highest Percentage In 106 Years (45.6 Million)
  • Sanctuary Cities – There Are Now Almost 1 Million Criminal Illegal Aliens At Large In The United States
  • Iceland Announced They Created The First Negative Emissions Plant In The World
  • Smartphones Have Become An Essential Aspect Of Our Sense Of Self
  • Rick Perry, US Secretary Of Energy, Takes Action To Preserve The U.S. Electrical Grid
  • Censured Missouri State Senator, Maria Chappelle-Nadal, Compares Donald Trump To Hitler
  • U.S. Withdraws From UNESCO